Pilot Project RFP

PILOT PROJECT RFP

INTEGRATING INNATE AND ADAPTIVE PATHWAYS IN VACCINE RESPONSES

PILOT PROJECTS SUBMISSION DEADLINES
Round One is October 15, 2014
Round Two is May 31, 2015
Round Three is March 31, 2016
Round Four is March 31, 2017
Round Five is March 31, 2018

OVERVIEW and ELIGIBILITY
As part of the Rockefeller University Cooperative Center on Human Immunology (CCHI), pilot projects are solicited for each year of the award, as indicated above. All Pilot Projects will focus on human immunology and infection, vaccination, or a vaccine adjuvant(s), and must include studies on primary human cells or tissues. Projects from Clinical Scholars and from basic investigators that extend their studies to clinical or translational research are particularly welcome.

A second year of funding is possible, but will be determined after a progress report for the first year is submitted and the funding will be competitive with new submissions. Approximately 2 awards will be made each Round.

FUNDING and EXPENDITURE
A maximum of $50,000 in direct costs should be requested for the period of one year. Continued funding at an additional $50,000 direct costs will be considered.

HOW TO APPLY
Applications must be received on or before 5:00 PM, ET, on the deadline listed at the top of this announcement. All applications are to be sent as an electronic e-mail attachment in PDF format to mdilillo@rockefeller.edu. The subject line of your e-mail should read "Request for Pilot Project Funding-CCHI".

Send the application to:

Meghan DiLillo
Grants Manager/CCHI Program Administrator
(212) 327-7320
E-mail: mdilillo@rockefeller.edu
A confirmation e-mail will be sent when your submission is successfully received.

CONTENT AND FORM OF APPLICATION

FORMAT SPECIFICATIONS
Follow format and font specifications as outlined below. Applications that do not follow instructions will be deemed non-responsive to this RFA.

In no more than 2 pages for sections 1-5 (no template), the application should contain the following: (Applications longer than 2 pages will be deemed non-responsive to this RFA)

  1. Abstract and Public Relevance Statement (one paragraph max. in length)
  2. Specific Aims
  3. Significance
  4. Innovation
  5. Approach and Project Timeline
  6. Literature Citations
  7. Budget and budget justification (using NIH form 398)
  8. Biographical sketches (using NIH form 398)
  9. Letter(s) of collaboration/support
  10. Letter of commitment from partnering faculty/institution (if applicable)
  11. Use of Vertebrate Animals (if applicable)

If the study involves a design where statistical methods are used to determine the number of subjects that need to be studied, that statistical information should be included as a part of Research Design and Methods but will not count towards the 2-page length. Applicants submitting research proposals including human subjects research are encouraged to consult the Research Facilitation Office, the IRB, or the Clinical Research Support Office for at least preliminary discussions about feasibility. If a study involves vertebrate animals, the five points detailed below in item nine should be included but will not count towards the 2-page length.

  1. ABSTRACT/PUBLIC RELEVANCE STATEMENT
    The application should include a brief abstract suitable for publication to the CCHI website, if chosen for award (no more than 30 lines of text). It should be a self-contained description of the project, and should contain a statement of objectives and methods to be employed. It should be informative to other persons working in the same or related fields. Additionally, include a one- or two-sentence description written in lay terms regarding the relevance of the proposed study to public health (not included in 30 line limit).
  2. SPECIFIC AIMS
    In accordance with the standard NIH guidelines (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/424/index.htm), state concisely the goals of the proposed research and summarize the expected outcome(s), including the impact that the results of the proposed research will exert on the research field(s) involved.
  3. SIGNIFICANCE AND PRELIMINARY STUDIES
    In accordance with the standard NIH guidelines (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/424/index.htm), explain the importance of the problem or critical barrier to progress in the field that the proposed project addresses. Explain how the proposed project will improve scientific knowledge, technical capability, and/or clinical practice in one or more broad fields. Discuss preliminary studies, data, and or experience pertinent to this application, if any.
  4. INNOVATION
    In accordance with the standard NIH guidelines (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/424/index.htm), explain how the application challenges and seeks to shift current research or clinical practice paradigms. Describe any novel theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation or interventions to be developed or used, and any advantage over existing methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions. Explain any refinements, improvements, or new applications of theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions.
  5. APPROACH
    In accordance with the standard NIH guidelines (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/424/index.htm), describe the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses to be used to accomplish the specific aims of the project. Discuss potential problems, alternative strategies, and benchmarks for success anticipated to achieve the aims. If applicable, describe any strategy to establish feasibility and address the management of any high risk aspects of the proposed work. Point out any procedures, situations, or materials that may be hazardous to personnel and precautions to be exercised.
  6. LITERATURE CITATIONS
    Provide a literature citation page for all references throughout your proposal.
  7. BUDGET AND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION
    Using the NIH 398 detailed budget form, complete a budget for your requested year of support. Separately, provide written narrative justification for each expense requested. Refer to standard NIH policy, A-21 cost accounting standards, and the Rockefeller University negotiated F&A rate agreement for all requested costs. Additional questions regarding allowability of costs, or other budget concerns may be sent to Meghan DiLillo at mdilillo@rockefeller.edu.
  8. LETTERS OF COLLABORATION/SUPPORT
    Provide all appropriate letters of support, including any letters necessary to demonstrate the support of collaborators and/or mentors.
  9. USE OF VERTEBRATE ANIMALS, IF APPLICABLE
    If vertebrate animals are involved in the pilot project you are proposing, please address each of the five points below. Although no specific page limitation applies to this section of the application, be succinct. Failure to address the following five points will result in the application being designated as incomplete and will be grounds for The Rockefeller University Center CCHI to defer the application from review. The five points are as follows:
    1. Provide a detailed description of the proposed use of the animals for the work outlined in the Research Design and Methods section. Identify the species, strains, ages, sex, and numbers of animals to be used in the proposed work.
    2. Justify the use of animals, the choice of species, and the numbers to be used. If animals are in short supply, costly, or to be used in large numbers, provide an additional rationale for their selection and numbers.
    3. Provide information on the veterinary care of the animals involved.
    4. Describe the procedures for ensuring that discomfort, distress, pain, and injury will be limited to that which is unavoidable in the conduct of scientifically sound research. Describe the use of analgesic, anesthetic, and tranquilizing drugs and/or comfortable restraining devices, where appropriate, to minimize discomfort, distress, pain, and injury.
    5. Describe any method of euthanasia to be used and the reason(s) for its selection. State whether this method is consistent with the recommendations of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines on Euthanasia. If not, include a scientific justification for not following the recommendations.
  10. USE OF HUMAN SUBJECTS, IF APPLICABLE
    If your proposal includes human subjects/data and meets the NIH definition of Human Subjects Research*, please include a brief description describing any risks to human subjects (involvement, characteristics, and design; source of materials, potential risks), adequacy of protection against risks (recruitment and informed consent, protection against risks), potential benefits of proposed research, importance of knowledge to be gained, a data and safety monitoring plan, and related clinicaltrials.gov registrations, if needed. Also include language on inclusion of women, minorities, and children.

    *The DHHS regulations "Protection of Human Subjects" (45 CFR 46, administered by OHRP) define a human subject as a living individual about whom an investigator conducting research obtains data through intervention or interaction with the individual or identifiable private information. DHHS regulations define research at 45 CFR 46.102(d) as “a systematic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. Activities which meet this definition constitute research for purposes of this policy, whether or not they are conducted or supported under a program which is considered research for other purposes. For example, some demonstration and service programs may include research activities.

REVIEW CRITERIA
Projects will be evaluated on: 1) how pilot funds make possible new immunological discoveries, including development of key concepts and preliminary data used to establish larger and more extensive research programs; and 2) how the study enhances the ability of trainees and young investigators to advance their careers and secure grant funding for independent programs.

AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT
Awards will be announced one month prior to the anticipated start date.

TERMS OF AWARD
Prior to award, applicants will be informed of the applicable terms and conditions of award for pilot projects. Applicants will be expected to expend all of the funds before within the 12 months of their award. In special circumstances, individual requests to extend the funding will be considered on a case-by-case basis two months prior to the end of the pilot award period.

As part of the submission the proposer will be required to agree to comply with all applicable Federal policies, rules, and guidelines for research involving human and animal subjects. If the applicant’s project involves the use of human subjects the investigator is required to show proof of human subjects protection training and a copy of their most recent IRB approval letter for the project. If it involves vertebrate animals, evidence of IACUC approval is required.

Final progress reports for funded studies are due two months following the end of the budget period.

The Rockefeller University CCHI will communicate the results of the pilot projects as the program progresses; important new scientific discoveries will be shared with the community at large through traditional mechanisms such as presentations at meetings and publication of results in scientific journals.

All pilot project grantees will be asked to present their findings to The Rockefeller University Immunology community at a Chris Browne Center monthly seminar series.

INQUIRIES
Address inquiries to Meghan DiLillo, Grants Manager/CCHI Program Administrator, whose information is shown above.

 

 

PILOT PROJECT RFPINTEGRATING INNATE AND ADAPTIVE PATHWAYS IN VACCINE RESPONSESPILOT PROJECTS SUBMISSION DEADLINES Round One is October 15, 2014 Round Two is May 31, 2015 Round Three is March 31,